For Detroit Series 60® Engines 1987-2002

 

Each AirDog® Fuel Air Separation System and installation kit, except for Universal Models, is engine specific.

 

With AirDog®'s NEW Micro-Processor Fuel Filter Monitor, the operator now has peace of mind from real time knowledge about the status of his fuel filter and water separator. No more wasting time and money replacing a clean filter or driving with a dirty filter after unexpectedly taking on dirty fuel.

 

The AirDog® air/vapor return line can now be connected directly to the existing engine fuel return line, reducing installation time and materials. The necessary fittings and return line (for most installations) are included in the kit. No need to waste valuable time and money to install an expensive "second return line system".

 


24 Page AirDog® Installation Manual for 1987 - 2002 Detroit Diesel Series 60 Engines
Includes pictures and complete detailed instructions to make the AirDog® installation easy and successful!
Detroit Series 60 1987 - 2002 PFT Copy [...]
Adobe Acrobat document [2.2 MB]

CONTACT INFORMATION

PureFlow® Technologies, Inc.

5508 Business 50 West

Jefferson City, MO 65109

Toll Free:1.877.GO DIESEL

                (1.877.463.4373)

Direct: 1.573.635.0555

Fax:     1.573.635.0778

sales@pureflowtechnologies.com

 

Hours of Operation

  Monday-Friday

8:00 AM-4:30 PM


Saturday & Sunday

Closed

 


8 PG AirDog Commercial Brochure 2013.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [1.0 MB]
12 PG AirDog Marine Brochure 2012 with [...]
Adobe Acrobat document [1.3 MB]

 

How Does Air Become Entrained In Diesel Fuel?

 

As in all liquids, air becomes entrained in diesel fuel from sloshing and agitation! Air can be on the surface of the fuel in the form of foam or it can be in the bulk fluid in the form of tiny bubbles. Entrained Air is an issue of an "in use" engine in operating equipment!

 

What is Pump Cavitation?

 

Pump cavitation, simply put, is the pump not having enough pressure flow, or "Net Positive Pressure Head" of fuel coming into the inlet to completely fill the vacuum chamber of the pump.

 

Diesel fuel, as is true with all petroleum base liquids, will give off vapor when subjected to a vacuum. The amount of vapor depends upon the level of vacuum and temperature.



 

How Does Fuel Filter "Restriction" Effect Cavitation?



In the diesel engine industry, "fuel filter restriction" is a term that refers to the vacuum level at the inlet to the transfer or lift pump. It is measured in inches of mercury (in hg).

 

As the filter plugs with use, it further restricts the flow and increases the vacuum level in the pump.

 

The amount of vapor produced depends upon the level of vacuum.


 

What Else Increases Cavitation and Vapor? 

 

As the fuel levels in the tank(s) goes down as the fuel is burned, the "Dry Suction Lift" increases. This reduces the flow, increasing the vacuum.  

 

Operating at higher altitudes, where atmospheric pressure is less, reduces the fuel flow and increases vacuum. For example, at Denver,  atmospheric pressure  is about 17% less than at sea level and at Eisenhower Tunnel, it is approximately 32% less. Having less pressure to drive the fuel from the tank to the transfer pump, reduces the flow and increases the vacuum levels.

 

Higher fuel temperatures cause more vapor to form than cooler fuel under the same vacuum!